Soul Train Music Awards: who had the hottest hair

The 2012 Soul Train Music Awards was the much-anticipated award show hosted by BET of 2012.  The show brought some of the most talented black stars to the red carpet in Vegas. This year was not only an award show but also a celebration of the African-American music

Soul Train

Soul Train (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

in the history of Soul Train, and a tribute to the man we will all miss, Don Cornelius.

I did not get to watch the show until after it aired via BET’s website, as I usually do for all award shows. This show touched the lives of so many people and became the center of African-American Performance Practices in a time where few were seen or heard in television.  It was a celebration of life, and allowed African-Americans to just BE and express themselves.

So when I viewed the red carpet looks, I kinda kept in mind what this show was about and who brought an all encompassed  look reflective of  Soul Train style.

My 1st look of course goes to chairman Debra L. Lee, Esq, for kicking it off with a short curly coiffed natural look in black jacket and pants.

Reminiscent of the celebration of Soul Train where the Afro was synonymous with disco pants, and girls came ready to dance.

Whether this was planned or not it definitely was red carpet ready for the 2012 Soul Train Awards.

2nd Rapper Lil Mama gave it the red carpet the respect it deserves with a stunning up do and black gown that made her stand tall in presence as she strutted her stuff for the show.

3rd look for all-encompassing hair was artist Miguel.  His look captures the essence of the history African-American male artist, like Nat King Cole, fats Wallace and so many others.  It was strong in light of an era where masculinity in a look for African-American men is baggy pants or just a suit.  This look brought style and pizzazz (is that still a word). Applaud!

While the carpet was filled with runway divas, these are my favorite hair looks that encompassed history, the history of African Americans in music.  Refreshing, daring, and defying stereo-types.

My only wish was that more of the celebs would have shed their weaves for an Afro, or at least an Afro wig for the carpet.  After all the Soul Train music awards was about celebrating a heritage.

Celebrity Hair Trends: the best hair may not have been on the runway

While fashion week donned awesome fashion for 2013, the best hair inspiration might have been in your local mall window.

From New York to Milan, Fashion week is the ultimate in innovation and inspiration in fashion. 2013 calls for Organic patterns trended in texture, berry essences of color, and strength in structure and accessories.

I was so inspired by H&M hair ads! They give hair inspiration for 2013, and might have left the runway girls feeling like their missing something.

“If art was a cause to convey a message, then in every hair style there is a message”..mario gross.

Not only did they put out some of the most affordable clothing fashion on the racks, they complete the hair with awesome, refreshing and innovative hair trends.

Full, earthy, organic, textured ponytails, playful and young hair styles that girls will love trying to recreate, and the hair accessories are unbelievably fun, playful and fashion forward.

They definitely realize that no outfit is complete without the hair.

Along with H&M, Adele, Denzel Washington, David Beckham, Rihanna, Ginnifer Goodwin, Alicia Keys are just a few celebs that dawned a new era in hair with awesome hair trends.

Hair is definitely the new makeup for 2013 Here are some of my hair trend wishes for 2013:.

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Rihanna: comments on hair “foolery”

Rihanna rocks! Recently she was seen in a very short coiffed hair style that was absolutely amazing. Of course she is a style icon, fearless when it comes to hair change. As hair stylist we love a girl like her to sit in our chair. Rihanna will rock the hair, never tacky, and there is that ever so fine line in creativity.

I read this story on Global Grind http://m.globalgrind.com/style/rihanna-black-girl-hair-care-magazines-style-details where RiRi denounces the fashion magazines for some unwanted hair “foolery”.

I was litteraly in awe! Rihanna publicly shames the media and fashion for their betrayal of diversity and knowledge of hair texture.

Hmm, don’t act like you didn’t notice!

Pick up any fashion magazine and no girl every says to themselves I want that textured hair unless they already have it, and most of our desire to wear any look is based on what we see visually.

Incredible that she raised awareness to this hair issue or lack there of. This industry is amazingly growing in diversity and appreciation of all hair textures, but as Rihanna says “being able to do hair and being able to do black hair are 2 different things”.

She said it! Being a hairstylist of all ethnicities, I can clearly agree with her. And someone please answer why we still have “black salons” and “straight hair salons”. Hair stylist isn’t that a boring job, if you only do one texture. I have never worked in such a salon and can’t imagine touching or not touching every texture on the planet, and doing it well.

The same passion, detail, innovation when creating fine hairstyles for ads must also be put into textured hair styles for advertisement.

Usually on set there is always hairstylist with multi textural experience with a willingness to embrace diversity in hair textured even tho they don’t perform services on black hair or any other texture on a regular basis and that is a recipe for disaster. Especially when you cross a celebrity who has very textured tresses!

Hair is every girls “Diamonds”! No matter what texture, it should shine!

I love Rihanna for starting a dialog and her perspective is crucial to fashions image portrayal of diversity in hair. More importantly to helping create a more diverse reflection of American hair textures in fashion that givesdetail, newness, and creative style with the same passion as it does straight hair.

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